photosynthessence

Sometimes I imagine the wisdom I would learn if I could hear plants speak. Not in human words with cartoon mouths, but in their own ways, as a waft of juniper on hot air or the wavelengths of brilliant green of a backlit leaf. Oh what I would give to tap into the mycorrhizal network and hear from fragments of carbohydrates shuttled from one story to another. And yet, there is a deeper part of me that knows I already know some of the truths I would hear:

 All beings have wisdom. All beings are brought to their knees by life and that same life is the moonlight of shimmer in their eyes. Learning to listen & see is loving. 

All nature follows physio-chemical ways of the universe, but these principles--why water has such a high specific heat, how something as simple as Brownian motion enables diffusion and thus, getting oxygen to our cells--is divine.

Everything is feedback. 

Old Growth forests (or other habitats, like soil crusts) are the most precious jewels on earth. All of Earth has Old Growth potential under the right care. 

There is no one true way to know the living beings of this Earth. Some may use PCR, others, a camera, others yet, scents and spirits and ways beyond. You haveultimate permission to wholeheartedly love the world.

Predators and death and poop are all ecological gold. 

Access to natural beauty as simple and complex as a photosynthesizing leaf is essential. Essential as air. 

  

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Sharing the magic of science, one pipette at a time
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#tbt to last week when we hosted visiting scientists to do cyanogenesis in our lab
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These Acacia ants are hanging out by their host Acacia tree's extrafloral nectary, which secretes su
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Tiny droplets of sugar can protect plants because they attract ants and other predators to patrol th
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Tiny droplets of lima bean nectar ready to meet the GC! #gaschromatography #biopsu @Portland_State
Our research greenhouse has a garden of trap crops to keep pests away from our science plants and to
Croikey! I caught my first wild rhizobia nodule full of bacteria that fix nitrogen! #rhizobia #nitro
Here's a shoutout to the #spectrophotometer
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In honor of preparing to leave this Sunday to do field research in Costa Rica, here is an Acacia pla
When the desert blooms, it goes all out
The chemistry of change
This morning at work I locked eyes with a pollinator
Field ecology technique #1: transect quadrat analysis
Collecting nodules for analysis- aren't these balls of nitrogen fixation adorable? #rhizobia #biopsu
Thanks for the nerd love @wemcycle ⚡️🔬
#mossome
Behold the humble plant that can make cyanide
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trichomes
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About Adrienne

Adrienne grew up among the sagebrush and biological soil crust in Moab UT. After spending her childhood caked in red dirt, she moved to Portland, went to Grant high school, fell in love with Outdoor School, and studied biology at Western Oregon University. Adrienne developed her palette for coffee and scientific writing during her PhD in Biology as a National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellow in the Ballhorn Lab at Portland State University.  Adrienne spent two years as a postdoctoral researcher in the Laboratoire d'écologie fonctionnelle at the Université de Neuchâtel where she learned the aromatic floral scent of a dung mimicry pollination system and picked up some French.

Adrienne is currently mentoring students in soil biology restoration and student-driven research projects around the world through the Soil Food Web School